Depression Lace

This type of embroidery on gingham fabric was very popular during the depression when lace was a luxury most could not afford.

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I first learned about Depression Lace (aka chicken scratch embroidery, Hoover lace, Amish embroidery, gingham lace, snowflake embroidery, broderie Suisse) about a year ago and I really wanted to try it but I never managed to find any good cotton gingham so that I could try it.

But last week I went to Ikea, and to my joy, found that they have this nice pink cotton gingham for $6.95 Canadian a metre. Score! (They have some very nice linen as well, that’ll be my next purchase. 🙂 I love Ikea’s fabric department.)

So before trying a nice gingham apron (a la Dorothy and The Wizard Of Oz) or some nice depression lace throw pillows, I thought I would play around and experiment with a sort of sampler. Continue reading “Depression Lace”

Must See: Renate Kirkpatrick’s Dreamcatchers

Originally posted on Renate Kirkpatrick's Freeform Crochet~Knit~Fibre Designs:
Dreamcatchers… something new & different from me that I’ve wanted to try for some time. I’ve created these Dreamcatchers, not as authentic representations but as my own personal artistic interpretations. I’m an Aussie, so my interest in dreamcatchers isn’t cultural… I simply love them…

Here is a post that is worth checking out. It is a beautiful series of interpretive dreamcatchers, made by one of my favourite inspirations, Renate Kirkpatrick. She’s an Aussie but her dreamcatchers would be popular here in the Cree/Ojibwa lands too.

And yes, she is another Renata like me, different spelling, same pronunciation. Extra bonus!

Check out her freeform crochet, you’ll be happy you did. 🙂

Lots of love,
Baba StringThings (aka Renata from Winnipeg)

Renate Kirkpatrick's Freeform Crochet~Knit~Fibre Designs

dreamcatchers

Dreamcatchers… something new & different from me that I’ve wanted to try for some time. I’ve created these Dreamcatchers, not as authentic representations but as my own personal artistic interpretations.

I’m an Aussie, so my interest in dreamcatchers isn’t cultural… I simply love them & more over, I love the idea of them.

Dreamcatchers originate in Native American tradition, believing both positive & negative dreams flow through the night & that a Dreamcatcher, hanging freely over or near a sleeping person, will allow the good dreams to pass through while capturing the bad dreams, which will perish & vanish with the rising sun…

I used patterns from this collection of 16 Crochet Motifs & embellished with wooden, glass & plastic beads & attached swivel cams so the dreamcatcher can rotate freely…

Dreamcatcher 1Dreamcatcher 7Dreamcatcher 6Dreamcatcher 2Dreamcatcher 3Dreamcatcher 4Dreamcatcher 5

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Wrist Love For Crocheters

This is a great post by Paardje about hand and wrist health for us crochet and knit maddened craftspeople. I just tried the wrist yoga and it feels GREAT, especially the stretch.

Gotta keep these wrists supple, amiright?

Of Snailmail, Books & Vanities

cat-691175_960_720I’ve been crocheting a cardigan which has significantly increased the number of ‘swirling’ motions I do with my right wrist through the copious use of treble stitches.

Add this bag to that.

Plus my quest to improve my wheel pose (which challenges my wrists, among other body parts).

And I’m feeling something just a tad bit off in my right wrist o_O

I am reminded of an amazing crochet artist whose blog I regularly visit for inspiration. She’s been out of commission for quite some time now due to wrist issues.

So my dearest fellow hookers I thought I’d make this post all about wrist/hand care exercises because most of the time, we just take for granted how important our amazing and very hardworking hands/wrists are. And they hardly ever complain! Unless perhaps when it’s too late 😮 😮 😮

I know it’s very hard to put down those hooks…

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Baba’s Current StringThings

Here is what I have been working on this week…

Here is a quick round up of what I’ve got on the go this week…

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A Pretty Peacock Blanket for Miss.B.
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Blocking a new piece of thread crochet, a pattern-free mandala or doily.

Continue reading “Baba’s Current StringThings”

Does Anyone Else Rescue Abandoned Craft Projects?

Finding a half finished and abandoned craft project always makes me so sad…

Finding a half finished and abandoned craft project always makes me so sad…

I always wonder what happened? Did the crafter just get bored? Or did someone’s mother  get old, and in the process of sorting their stuff out, a son or daughter decided to donate a half completed project?

I always feel that there is a tragedy there.

Continue reading “Does Anyone Else Rescue Abandoned Craft Projects?”

Finding Treasures

S0, as you Winnipegger’s may know, Wolsley’s Neighbourhood Bookstore and Cafe is closed (temporarily I am POSITIVE). I encourage action!

Anyway, I just read this wonderful post about finding fibre-love treasure in second-hand bookstores ad thought to share it with you.

Two of the best finds I ever made at the cafe were ‘Plain and Fancy: American Women and Their Needlework, 1700-1850’ by Susan Burrows Swan (found last week!) and the ‘Woman’s Day Book of American Needlework’, by Rose Wilder Lane. (Yes, Laura’s daughter!) It still had it’s companion box of patterns too!

Have you made any amazing finds second-hand?

A good second-hand book store is a pearl beyond price.:-)

The Sweaty Knitter, Weaver and Devotee of Other Fiber Arts

I enjoy roaming the aisles of used book stores.  Over the years I have found some amazing HandweaversWorkbookbooks for very little money.  Recently I came across a 1956 edition of A Handweaver’s Workbook by Heather G. Thorpe (originally published 1936, reissued in 1974).  Not surprising given its age, the book is hardbound, and the pages are printed on heavy acid-free pages. It is also in perfect condition, nary a pencil mark! What a find!

Browsing through it, I was impressed by its thorough yet not overwhelming approach to introducing weaving.  I learned some interesting facts I’ve not seen newer weaving survey books or learned in a weaving class.

Did you know (I didn’t!) that …

PorteeCrossThere are different names for crosses on warps made withe a paddle dependent upon their position:  The first cross at the end of a warp is called a porrey cross; the second cross is called…

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Chatelaines: The Original Multi-App Mobile Device!

My Chatelaine isn’t as pretty as the Victorian ones, but it’s just as handy.

Continue reading “Chatelaines: The Original Multi-App Mobile Device!”